I love those Eureka moments

I love those Eureka moments

Lisa McHenry

When Lisa McHenry ’97 and her co-workers were laid off from their jobs at a church conference center in 2007 following a change in the facility’s ownership, Lisa knew she wanted to find another job that would allow her to make a difference in people’s lives. The University of North Carolina at Greensboro, she thought, would be perfect. “I became who I am here,” says Lisa, who earned a bachelor’s degree in anthropology with a minor in communications from the university. “I liked the idea of working with students and being able to give back.”

UNCG did not have an opening that was right for her at the time, so Lisa went to work at a law firm, still keeping her eye on UNCG’s job listings. Less than a year later, Lisa saw an opening that seemed ideal: The Department of Consumer, Apparel, and Retail Studies (CARS) sought an administrative support associate. It has, indeed, turned out to be a perfect fit: This year, Lisa was honored with the Bryan School Staff Excellence Award.

In her role, Lisa has a broad array of marketing and communications responsibilities that include everything from keeping the department’s website and social media sites up to date to creating promotional materials. She also serves as the department’s graduate secretary, providing program, policy and procedural information to students and prospective students; processing graduate program application materials; and providing customer service to visitors and callers. Ever-curious, Lisa is eager to learn new ways of doing her job better, whether that means going back to school to earn a certificate in web design or combing through the latest Campus Weekly to discover other UNCG programs and services that could benefit CARS students. “I’m always striving to learn new things,” she says. “I love solving puzzles and finding solutions to problems—those ‘Eureka!’ moments. The days filled with ‘Eureka!’ moments are the best.”

Working with talented, driven CARS students is a particular joy for Lisa. “Many of these students are following a dream. They are passionate about what they’re doing,” she says. “It’s exciting to watch them grow as they develop their skills, both creatively and in terms of their business acumen.”

On a typical day—particularly during the fall semester—a large chunk of Lisa’s time is devoted to helping a steady stream of those students with questions and problems both large and small. One student might need a Band-Aid after cutting a hand in the design lab; the next might need advice about taking a short leave of absence after a death in the family.

“I spend much of my day problem solving for students,” Lisa says. “In college, they are encountering many things on their own for the first time. They don’t always know where to go or what to do if they have a problem. I remember how that feels as a student. My goal is to empower them to learn to handle things themselves. I may point them in the right direction or walk them through a process. I try to be an advocate, while helping them learn to navigate on their own.”

In nominating Lisa for the excellence award, Rachel Wilson ’15, then-president of the student-run CARS organization THREADS, highlighted Lisa’s skills at gently helping students develop their own problem-solving abilities: “I first met Lisa about three years ago under unfortunate circumstances. I was trying to register for classes and it was so confusing that I’d done it wrong. With no clue how to get my classes correct and having just been told I would be at UNCG for an additional year, I went outside, sat down and cried. I cried for a while before (Lisa) sat down next to me and asked me what was wrong, not even knowing I was a CARS student. Lisa took me to the CARS office and personally helped me get my classes sorted out and assured me that I was not a failure, that I just needed a little help. That is the sort of thing that Lisa does every day. Not because she has to, but because she has such a big heart.”

By Julie A. Palm

Photo by Martin Kane, UNCG Photographer

MBA project for local nonprofit earns 3rd in national competition

MBA project for local nonprofit earns 3rd in national competition

PIC12338-Luminaire-BK-004

A pair of UNCG MBA students won third place in the 2015 Small Business Institute Project of the Year contest for their analysis of the economic impact of Family Service of the Piedmont.

The students’ research found that the work of Family Service of the Piedmont to promote financial stability, provide mental health services, stem domestic violence and prevent child abuse has an both positive social impact and a high economic return on investment. For instance, the agency’s Domestic Violence Intervention Program, which has a 92 percent success rate, cost $82,000 but had an economic impact of $1.7 million. Every dollar spent saved the county $20.50 in inmate, court, probation and law enforcement costs.

 

Read the full article at UNCGNow >>

Bryan MBA program ranks No. 13 by Bloomberg Businessweek

Bryan MBA program ranks No. 13 by Bloomberg Businessweek

Bryan-13

The UNCG Bryan School of Business and Economics’ evening MBA program has vaulted to No. 13 in the nation in newly released rankings of the best part-time MBA programs by Bloomberg Businessweek.

I could not be more pleased with this fantastic improvement in our ranking. Our faculty and staff have worked hard to improve our program and make it relevant to both students and employers.  Our focus on producing exceptional problem solvers who understand innovation, globalization, sustainability and ethics is resonating with students and employers.

said Bryan School Dean McRae C. Banks.

To have the fourth best MBA among public universities — eclipsed only by Berkeley, UCLA and Michigan — is a tremendous accomplishment that reinforces the high quality of what we are doing at UNCG.

Read more at UNCGNow

CARS fashion program gains national attention

CARS fashion program gains national attention

CARS Receive National News
UNCG’s Department of Consumer, Apparel and Retail Studies has been ranked the 13th best fashion program in the nation by a fashion website, and the third best program in the South.

The program jumped 10 spots from its 2013 placement and got the best ranking among programs in the state of North Carolina. Department chair Nancy J. Hodges said the jump in rankings from 23rd to 13th is a direct reflection of the dedication of the faculty, staff and students.
Sally Crumpler Jobe ’64 Honors School with Gift to Renovate Conference Room

Sally Crumpler Jobe ’64 Honors School with Gift to Renovate Conference Room

spacer

Renovations are complete in Bryan Room 419, made possible through a generous gift from Sally Crumpler Jobe ‘64 and her husband, Warren.  Named in honor of Sally, the newly renovated Sally Crumpler Jobe Conference Room provides a professional and modern space for meetings, videoconferencing and collaborations among business leaders, students, staff and faculty.

Sally Jobe toast for conference room

Sally (left) and her husband, Warren, share a toast with Chancellor Brady and Dean Banks to celebrate the ribbon cutting of the Sally Crumpler Jobe Conference Room

To celebrate the gift, Chancellor Linda Brady and Dean Mac Banks hosted a ribbon cutting ceremony to dedicate the newly renovated space.  Dean Banks summarized the importance of the Jobe’s gift and the lasting impact it will have.

The Sally Crumpler Jobe Conference Room will be an important place for building relationships and sharing ideas – now in a space that is fitting for a school of our caliber.  Thank you, Sally and Warren, for recognizing that need and for your generosity.

Joining Sally and her husband at the ribbon cutting were members of their family, faculty, staff and members of the Class of 1964 50th Reunion Planning Committee.  Sally made the gift in celebration of the 50th anniversary of her graduation from UNCG and as an expression of appreciation for the excellent education and opportunities she experienced as a student.

Sally graduated from UNCG with a degree in Economics and Business Administration.  As a student she served in the Student Government Association and was elected as University Marshal. Both of Sally’s sisters are also graduates of UNCG:  Margaret Crumpler Ladd ‘53 and Clara Crumpler Bitter ‘65.

Explaining the World

Explaining the World

Laura Simpson

UNCG alumna, Laura Simpson ‘00, is a SAS programmer and analyst at the Division of Institutional Research at UNC-Chapel Hill.  She has published several research papers on health and education and has been acknowledged for her contribution in others. Laura chose UNCG’s applied economics program because “it seemed more fun than accounting.” But, she had to work hard to get into the program.

As an undergraduate student of economics, Laura struggled with the macroeconomics course taught by Professor Ken Snowden. The department had strict standards for recruiting students in the applied economics program.

Read more at UNCG’s Economics website.

Leading mobile app Banjo firm founded by UNCG graduate

Leading mobile app Banjo firm founded by UNCG graduate

banjo

UNCG graduate Damien Patton, a 1999 finance graduate of the Bryan School of Business and Economics, is the founder and CEO of Banjo, the social discovery app that has become one of the leaders in the industry. Earning magna cum laude honors in and was named to Beta Gamma Sigma business honorary society and received a Dean’s Medal at graduation, he has created an app to track events and news as they begin trending on social media platforms.
Read more at UNCGNow

Learn more about the company at ban.jo

Creating the possible

Creating the possible

Becky Levin gives high school students business skills and so much more.

Becky Levin, a UNCG Bryan School alum and the 2008 Bryan School Distinguished Alumni Award recipient, dreams big.

Levin, who graduated from UNCG in 1979, founded a successful executive search firm and now is giving back in a big way. She and husband Mark started The Possible Project, an after-school entrepreneurship program for high school students, that teaches young people how to start and run their own businesses. Although most people would call these young people as “at-risk kids,” Becky prefers to call them “kids of untapped potential.”

Read more at UNCGNow

Read the UNCG Fall 2013 Alumni edition for more information about The Possible Project and Becky Levin.

Creating economic opportunities through research

Creating economic opportunities through research

Zack Oliver

Zack Oliver conducts research and develops tools to help bring jobs to North Carolina.

Zack Oliver, MA ’12 works as an economist in the Labor and Economic Analysis Division of the North Carolina Department of Commerce.  His work involves the study of economic development in the state, industry-based research, analyzing economic impacts, and involvement with the U.S. Census Bureau’s Local Employment Dynamics (LED) program.

Pursuing a master’s in applied economics was a part of his long-term plan.

UNCG seemed to be the best fit in terms of its excellent curriculum, the cost of education, and the proximity to my family.

Read more at UNCG’s Economics website.

Personalizing Poverty

Personalizing Poverty

Personalizing Poverty

It’s one thing to devote your professional career to studying anti-poverty measures. It’s something else to feed your research to your teenage children.
Unless you’re UNCG economics professor Dr. David Ribar. In a quest to discover if the federal government’s Thrifty Food Plan, designed to help impoverished families stretch their food budget, was realistic, he’s twice enlisted his family to try it out.

You can motivate some really good behaviour with your children by threatening them with turkey cabbage casserole

Ribar said with a smile.

Read more at UNCGNow