CONGRATULATIONS Connie Albert on winning the Three Minute Thesis competition!

Connie Albert won the Three Minute Thesis competition at UNCG in November 2013 which was sponsored by the UNCG Graduate School.  Following this win, the UNCG Graduate School funded Connie to compete at the regional competition held in San Antonio, TX and hosted by The Conference of Southern Graduate Schools where she was awarded second runner-up.  Connie has recently accepted a tenure-track position at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville and will begin this position August, 2014.

Congratulations Connie!

3MT Connie Albert

Left: Graduate School Associate Dean, Dr. Laura Chesak-Right: PhD student Connie Albert.  photo by Lorenzo Pedro

See video of presentation produced by Dan Smith: http://youtu.be/FiKKijAbaZs

Click here for more information.

CONGRATULATIONS to Dr. Ling Xue and Dr. Xia Zhao for their rank in the top 100 Information Systems researchers in the world!

Congratulations to Dr. Ling Xue and Dr. Xia Zhao for being ranked in the top 100 researchers (in the world) in the Information Systems area based on Association of Information Systems (AIS) Senior Scholars’ Basket of Journals (Information Systems Research, Management Information Systems Quarterly and Journal of Management Information Systems):

Dr. Ling Xue ranked 18th

Dr. Xia Zhao ranked 55th  

The details of the ranking are available at the following web link:

http://vvenkatesh.com/ISRanking/RankingsMISQISRJMISbyAut.asp?RYear=3

According to the criteria used in the ranking, UNCG is ranked 67th amongst the top 100 colleges and universities in the world.  The details of the ranking are available at the following web link:

http://vvenkatesh.com/ISRanking/RankingsMISQISRJMISbyUni.asp?RYear=3

Dr. Prashant Palvia Publishes “Critical Information in Technology Issues in Turkish Healthcare”

Dr. Prashant Palvia publishes Critical information in technology issues in Turkish healthcare in Elsevier’s Information and Management.

Abstract

While the importance of information technology in reducing soaring healthcare costs and enhancing service quality is increasingly being recognized, significant challenges remain in how it is implemented. Although there are a few studies investigating key IT issues in healthcare in advanced countries, there are virtually none in developing countries. We bridge this gap by investigating the critical information technology issues in healthcare facilities in Turkey. These issues are developed based on the opinions of senior hospital managers. The top ten issues include privacy, quality, security, and the implementation of electronic medical records. Further analyses provide additional insights into the results.

To view article, click Elsevier I&M.

ISSCM Professor Dr. Palvia and ISSCM PhD Alumnus Ravi Thambusamy Publish in JITCAR

ISSCM Professor Dr. Prashant Palvia and ISSCM PhD Alumnus Thambusamy publish in JITCAR:

ELECTRONIC MEDICAL RECORDS APPLICATION DEVELOPMENT: PERSPECTIVES OF THE
SERVICE PROVIDER

 

Prashant Palvia

The University of North Carolina at Greensboro, USA

pcpalvia@uncg.edu

Ravi Thambusamy

University of Arkansas at Little Rock, USA

rxthambusamy@ualr.edu

ABSTRACT

Healthcare Information Technology (HIT) is a relatively new phenomenon and refers to the use of computer applications to store, process, and use clinical, administrative, and financial information among various health care entities.  HIT is widely regarded as a key to improving the quality of healthcare in the United States and potentially reducing its cost. Yet, its implementation is a continuous challenge for the healthcare industry.  One of the key applications of HIT is Electronic Medical Records (EMR).  The implementation of an EMR system may result in improved and more efficient care and patient safety, but it may also incur additional costs. Furthermore, if the development of the application is undertaken by an offshore vendor, it adds another layer of complexity. This research case documents the experiences in the development and implementation of an EMR system for a U.S. client by an offshore vendor.  While client experiences abound  in the literature, this study is unique in that it draws from the perspective of the service provider. Key findings of the study show that the major issues related to EMR development by an offshore vendor include gaining domain knowledge, requirements generation, and access to expertise. Like offshoring projects in general, client-vendor communication remains perennially important.  Beyond EMR, this vendor’s critical success factors in HIT projects offshore development additionally include scope containment, need for a client liaison, and managing non-functional expectations.

 

Dr. Palvia Publishes “Measuring Value Dimensions of IT Occupational Culture: an exploratory analysis” in Springer

ISSCM professor Dr. Prashant Palvia’s publication appears in Springer Science+Business Media entitled, Measuring value dimensions of IT occupational culture:  an exploratory analysis

Abstract

Culture in information systems (IS) research has been an important area of study for over twenty-five years but has focused on two levels of analysis: national and organizational. However, research at the level of IT occupational culture has been minimal. Shared values are the core element of any cultural group and the IS literature has repeatedly called for measurable dimensions of IT culture. This study is an exploratory positivist investigation into scale creation and proposes a set of six value dimensions specific to the context of IT occupational culture based on a review of the relevant IS literature culture as well as interviews with IT professionals. These six dimensions are: Structure of Power, Control, Open Communication, Risk, Reverence for Knowledge, and Enjoyment (abbreviated as SCORRE). A preliminary instrument was prepared and tested with an empirical study. The instrument was found to have both high reliability and construct validity and is ready for further use in ongoing research. There was further evidence that SCORRE represents many core values that form the foundation of IT occupational culture.

ISSCM PhD Student Jeffrey Wall and ISSCM Professor Dr. Palvia Co-Author Publication in JIPS

ISSCM PhD Student Jeffrey Wall and ISSCM Professor Dr. Palvia co-author article, “Control Related Motivations and Information Security Policy Compliance:  The Role of Autonomy and Efficacy” in the Journal of Information Privacy & Security.  Click here to view article.

ISSCM PhD Student Don Heath and ISSCM Professors Dr. Singh and Dr. Taube Co-author Publication in MIS Quarterly Executive

ISSCM PhD student Don Heath and ISSCM professors Dr. Rahul Singh and Dr. Larry Taube co-author publication in MIS Quarterly Executive entitled “Building Thought Leadership Through Business-to-Business Social Media Engagement at Infosys”.

Abstract

We present a framework for building thought leadership with key stakeholders through business-to-business social media engagement. We use this framework to describe how Infosys, an early adopter of social media, has strategically engaged with its customers to manage its brand, inform overall market directions and guide the company’s future strategy.

 

Dymtro Babik Publishes in the Journal of Management Strategy

Dmytro Babik (Information Systems and Supply Chain Management) has been recognized as a co-author in Dr. Eric Ford’s (Management) and article Aligning Strategic Orientation with Information Resources published in the Journal of Management Strategy.

Abstract

In today’s digital society, technology-based resources are emerging and changing far more rapidly than organizational systems and structures. While information management is critical to strategy at both the formulation and implementation stages, strategic decisions often must be made quickly, and with less rationality than is desirable. This paper provides an analytical framework based on the types of information needed for specific strategic orientations. The proposed framework, or information resource matrix (IRM), integrates the strategy typology of Miles and Snow (1978), the uncertainty dimensions of Milliken (1987), and the decision-making model of Simon (1963). The IRM identifies a firm’s information needs for a given strategic orientation. Using the IRM, managers can tailor information systems to fit their strategic information needs.

Triple congratulations to Dr. Lakshmi Iyer

Congratulations to Dr. Lakshmi Iyer on the following accomplishments:

  • Dr. Iyer was part of a team that received a $67,000 grant from the Elsevier Foundation New Scholars Grants Program to create an enduring pathway to assist women in Information Systems in achieving academic and/or professional career success.
  • Dr. Iyer was appointed co-chair of a task force on Women in IS by the primary professional society in the IS field, Association of Information Systems (aisnet.org).
  • Dr. Iyer received a TechSavvy grant from AAUW National (in collaboration with the AAIW Greensboro Branch) (http://www.aauw.org/what-we-do/stem-education/tech-savvy/). Only 10 pilot sites have been selected nationally. This project, a one day STEM program for girls in grades 6 to 9 and their parents, is in collaboration with JSNN and NCA&T.

ISSCM PhD student Connie Albert wins Three Minute Thesis competition

Connie Albert won the Three Minute Thesis competition yesterday afternoon. Sponsored by the UNCG Graduate School, the competition involved multiple rounds. Connie was one of ten graduate students competing today in the finals, along with CARS graduate student Minita Sanghvi. Although Minita did not win, she has other good news as she has accepted a position at Skidmore College beginning in 2014-15. Congratulations to both Connie and Minita!

Click here for more information.